Installing a XAMPP development
environment for WordPress

This article examines why a local development and testing environment is a good idea for a remotely hosted WordPress site, and how to go about installing such an environment with the open source XAMPP web server stack on a Windows PC.

Why?

It’s good practice, based on professional development methods.

In well-funded private sector environments staffed by skillful specialists, every live system has at least one development environment, but maybe several sandboxes independent of each other.

Each of these sandboxes connects to an n-Tier development environment of servers and software. The concept of ‘n-Tier’ architectures refers to the number (hence the n) or levels of components in a complete system. The reason I specified well-funded above is that the expense of a system increases with every layer of hardware and software required.

For that reason, the development environment might not resemble the production environment very closely at all, as suggested in the hypothetical model illustrated in Figure 1 below. In that hypothetical, a bunch of developer PCs or laptops connect to just two development servers simulating a production environment that involves five servers (and maybe even more if one or another function is clustered for failover or scalability).

Continue reading “Installing a XAMPP development
environment for WordPress”

Installing a XAMPP developmentenvironment for WordPress

This article examines why a local development and testing environment is a good idea for a remotely hosted WordPress site, and how to go about installing such an environment with the open source XAMPP web server stack on a Windows PC.

Why?

It’s good practice, based on professional development methods.

In well-funded private sector environments staffed by skillful specialists, every live system has at least one development environment, but maybe several sandboxes independent of each other.

Each of these sandboxes connects to an n-Tier development environment of servers and software. The concept of ‘n-Tier’ architectures refers to the number (hence the n) or levels of components in a complete system. The reason I specified well-funded above is that the expense of a system increases with every layer of hardware and software required.

For that reason, the development environment might not resemble the production environment very closely at all, as suggested in the hypothetical model illustrated in Figure 1 below. In that hypothetical, a bunch of developer PCs or laptops connect to just two development servers simulating a production environment that involves five servers (and maybe even more if one or another function is clustered for failover or scalability).

Continue reading “Installing a XAMPP developmentenvironment for WordPress”