Installing a XAMPP development
environment for WordPress

This article examines why a local development and testing environment is a good idea for a remotely hosted WordPress site, and how to go about installing such an environment with the open source XAMPP web server stack on a Windows PC.

Why?

It’s good practice, based on professional development methods.

In well-funded private sector environments staffed by skillful specialists, every live system has at least one development environment, but maybe several sandboxes independent of each other.

Each of these sandboxes connects to an n-Tier development environment of servers and software. The concept of ‘n-Tier’ architectures refers to the number (hence the n) or levels of components in a complete system. The reason I specified well-funded above is that the expense of a system increases with every layer of hardware and software required.

For that reason, the development environment might not resemble the production environment very closely at all, as suggested in the hypothetical model illustrated in Figure 1 below. In that hypothetical, a bunch of developer PCs or laptops connect to just two development servers simulating a production environment that involves five servers (and maybe even more if one or another function is clustered for failover or scalability).

Continue reading “Installing a XAMPP development
environment for WordPress”

Installing a XAMPP developmentenvironment for WordPress

This article examines why a local development and testing environment is a good idea for a remotely hosted WordPress site, and how to go about installing such an environment with the open source XAMPP web server stack on a Windows PC.

Why?

It’s good practice, based on professional development methods.

In well-funded private sector environments staffed by skillful specialists, every live system has at least one development environment, but maybe several sandboxes independent of each other.

Each of these sandboxes connects to an n-Tier development environment of servers and software. The concept of ‘n-Tier’ architectures refers to the number (hence the n) or levels of components in a complete system. The reason I specified well-funded above is that the expense of a system increases with every layer of hardware and software required.

For that reason, the development environment might not resemble the production environment very closely at all, as suggested in the hypothetical model illustrated in Figure 1 below. In that hypothetical, a bunch of developer PCs or laptops connect to just two development servers simulating a production environment that involves five servers (and maybe even more if one or another function is clustered for failover or scalability).

Continue reading “Installing a XAMPP developmentenvironment for WordPress”

WordPress and design principles

Updated: 13 October 2014

A post about the creation and development of this site.

Why?

In 1994, when I first dabbled with building my own web pages, I had some small storage area on my ISP’s server with no associated domain name.
My intention then had been to experiment with the code that makes web pages look the way they do in browsers – hypertext markup language (HTML). Over time I built content around my contemporary preoccupations, which have been pretty stable: political economy and philosophy, film, and writing about everything that strikes me as noteworthy.

As time passed and technology improved I maintained an interest in HTML and the emergingly useful cascading style sheets (CSS) which offered an abstracted method for rendering the look and feel of an increasingly sparse HTML base.

In the two decades of messing about with web pages, I have created and abandoned maybe a dozen online collection of essays and other content. This was probably due to the fact that in 1994 blogging was unknown, web hosting was expensive, and I had no profit motive.

Continue reading “WordPress and design principles”