Schumpeter’s fatuousness re-visited

The Economist’s recent Schumpeter column again floated to the top of my preoccupations today, coalescing with some more immediately personal ones as I rode my bicycle along the river in today’s perfect Brisbane spring weather.

Maria Montessori, 1870-1952.  Is that Jimmy Wales sniffling in the foreground?
Maria Montessori, 1870-1952. Is that Jimmy Wales sniffling in the foreground?

The real Schumpeter’s influence in economics, and fairly much everything else, has been trivialised as putting into general circulation the much abused term ‘creative destruction’, which one must suppose has been taken by the Economist’s less skilled leader writers as a remit to deride whatever aspect of business escapes their understanding on any given day.

As I pedalled my way towards Newstead, I contemplated M Sinclair Stevens’ vehemence in excoriating Schumpeter for making an admittedly somewhat tenuous link between open plan office layouts favoured by a few of America’s über-plutocratic tech Wunderkindchen and the Montessori pedagogy attached by Schumpeter to Larry Page, Sergey Brin, Jeff Bezos, and Jimmy Wales by virtue of them having attended Montessori schools.

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